Sunday, December 22, 2013

Predictably, the Washington Post releases a major CIA story during a week when no one is paying attention

The best times to read the paper are Friday nights and holiday periods. That's when the more sensitive stories the CIA doesn't want you to read are often put out. It's happened over and over through history.

This holiday season, the Washington Post released an important story ( on covert operations describing how we've given "smart bomb" and GPS technology to Columbia to go after rebels.

Imagine if the British had access to such weapons in 1776. There could have been no such revolution.

That's what's really frightening about drones, smart bombs, and other weapons that target people based on GPS settings. And now we're giving them away to neighbors in the hemisphere.

I feel we are sowing the seeds of our own destruction with each such weapon introduced. It's only a matter of time before someone figures out how to use them here.

I also feel it's absolutely heinous to be killing people rather than trying to capture them and put them on trial. If people are so overtly evil and active, there should be other ways to get to them. I don't care if it takes time. Just killing people without trial is barbaric and something that, as Americans, we should not be supporting.

I hope you enjoy the holidays. I hope, too, that you spend a little mental energy envisioning the kind of things America should, and shouldn't, be doing on the world stage to make the world a better place. It starts with thoughts, and thoughts have power and gravity. Help the world by putting more positive solutions into it. Killing is so last century. Seriously, we have to be better than that, 2000 years after some man changed the world by saying we should love our enemies, not kill them.


Anonymous Mark said...

The Cocaine Importation Agency is taking sides in a dispute over the drug trade.

Uruguay has a better approach.


Uruguay's president José Mujica: no palace, no motorcade, no frills
In the week that Uruguay legalises cannabis, the 78-year-old explains why he rejects the 'world's poorest president' label

Jonathan Watts in Montevideo
The Guardian, Friday 13 December 2013 08.37 EST

"We can almost recycle everything now. If we lived within our means – by being prudent – the 7 billion people in the world could have everything they needed. Global politics should be moving in that direction," he said. "But we think as people and countries, not as a species."


Mujica's comment reminds me of JFK's second and last speech to the UN, September 20, 1963.

1:28 AM  

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